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17154 FM 1025
Batesville, Texas  78829

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Venmo & Zelle

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FAQ

WHAT LICENSE DO I NEED TO HUNT?

The Texas Migratory Game Bird Stamp Endorsement, Type 168 ($7) is required to hunt any migratory game bird (waterfowl, coot, rail, gallinule, snipe, dove, sandhill crane, and woodcock). Please make sure to ask for this additional endorsement when buying your license. Texas Hunting Licenses can be purchased online here.

THIS LIABILITY WAIVER MUST BE PRINTED & SIGNED PRIOR TO YOUR ARRIVAL DATE. If not previously submitted via e-mail, you must review, print, sign and bring with you on your arrival date. You will NOT be allowed to hunt or remain on the property unless this waiver is signed.

HOW MUCH AMMO SHOULD I BRING?

Always take more shotshells than you think you'll need. Even when you're certain you're Deadeye Dick, doves can prove you wrong. Studies indicate dove hunters average about three birds bagged per 25 shots. With that said, we suggest you bring a minimum of a case of shotgun shells.

WHEN SHOULD I SHOOT?

Allow doves to come within 25-35 yards before shooting. At this range, you'll probably shoot more accurately, and use fewer shells.

WHEN SHOULD I NOT SHOOT?

Avoid low angle shots: This is vital for everyone's safety during a dove hunt. A low angle shot could put your pellets flying towards another hunter's position. Pass up low-flying birds - there will be plenty more.

WHAT SHOULD I WEAR?

Wear camouflage or drab clothing and avoid movement: Blaze orange hunting apparel has its place in hunting, but not dove hunting. Doves can see color and will flare when they detect bright-hued clothing that sticks out from its surroundings. A tan or olive-colored outfit is just about as good as camouflage clothing, but no matter what you wear, be sure to also avoid moving when a bird or flock is in view. Once they've been exposed to a bit of hunting pressure, doves become particularly wary and will flare if a hunter repositions himself or starts to raise his gun before they are in range.

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I BRING WITH ME?

- Valid Texas Hunting License with a Migratory Bird Stamp Endorsement

- Printed & Signed RSR Outfitters Waiver

- No less than a 20-gauge shotgun

- A minimum of a case of shotgun shells

- Field Chair

- Bird Bags

- Shooting Glasses &/or Shooting Sunglasses

- Ear Plugs

- Bird Hunting Vest

- Sunscreen

- Insect Repellent

- A hat with a brim to keep the sun out of your eyes

- Binoculars to track dove movements

- Alcoholic Beverages (snacks & water will be provided during hunt)

                                                               

If you forget any of the items listed above, we have your back as we'll have items for sale on-site!

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I KNOW FOR A SUCCESSFUL HUNT?

Don't stop your swing: This is one of the most common mistakes in shooting doves. Pull up on the bird, keep your cheek down tight to the stock and fire as the barrel covers the quarry. BUT KEEP SWINGING. If you don't, you'll surely send a wad of pellets flying through the air behind the quarry.

 

Don't raise your gun too soon: If you do this, you lose the natural swinging motion that makes wingshooting a fluid, rhythmic activity of raising the gun, aiming and firing. Another problem with raising your gun too soon is that the birds might see your movement and flare out of range or swerve, making for a more difficult shot. Wait until the dove is just about into shooting range, meaning 40 yards or less, and then raise the shotgun in one smooth motion, firing as the barrel tracks ahead of the target.

 

Carry a hunting seat: When dove hunting, a small camouflaged fold-up stool with a compartment built in beneath the seat is a handy item to have. You can put extra shells, sunglasses, a drink, and snacks in the compartment and use the seat to reduce the strain on your legs and back throughout the hunt. Alternately, you can take a large plastic paint bucket and camouflage it, carrying your gear in it for the hike in and out and using it as a seat during the hunt.